Custom Game Paced Video Games Played by Persons Post-Stroke Have Comparable Exercise Intensity but Higher Accuracy, Greater Enjoyment and Less Effort than Off-The-Shelf Game

Judith Deutsch | Brittany Hoehlein | Marisa Priolo | Joshua Pacifico | Harish Damodaran | Urska Puh (2019).
In Proc. 13th Int'l Conf. on Virtual Rehab., WG Wright, S Subramanian, G Fluet, M Agmon, RM Proffitt, M Roberts (Eds), Tel Aviv

Abstract

Use of active video games in stroke rehabilitation is
supported with efficacy studies of balance and mobility for persons in
acute, sub-acute and chronic phases post-stroke. They have been
characterized as well for their potential promotion of physical
activity (PA). Games may be designed specifically for rehabilitation,
or adapted from their intended recreational use for serious
application such as rehabilitation or promotion of PA. A major
limitation of the commercially available games is their lack of
customization of movement parameters and inability to record
performance metrics that are useful for practice. They are however,
considered engaging and may promote high intensity of therapy
(repetitions and physiologic correlates). This study compared the
performance of persons in the chronic phase post-stroke playing a
custom rehabilitation game to a comparable recreational active
video game. The goal of the study was to determine, which game
promoted greater exercise intensity and which was more enjoyable
and less effortful. Fifteen participants in the chronic phase post-
stroke were studied. The recreational game was played at a
significantly higher intensity, both for repetitions, and energy
expenditure while the experience of playing the custom game was
reported as more enjoyable and less effortful. Further, movement
accuracy was greater during custom game play. While intensity for
metabolic equivalents (METs) and % of maximum heart rate were
significantly greater when the recreational game was played, both
games were played in the same intensity band to promote moderate
activity. The custom game was comparable in intensity but superior
in performance, enjoyment and perception of effort. The findings
support efforts to develop custom games to promote physical activity
for persons post-stroke.

Custom Game Paced Video Games Played by Persons Post-Stroke Have Comparable Exercise Intensity but Higher Accuracy, Greater Enjoyment and Less Effort than Off-The-Shelf Game

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