Playing Self-Paced Video Games Requires the Same Energy Expenditure but is more Enjoyable and Less Effortful than Standard of Care Activities

Aurora James-Palmer | Urska Puh | Harish Damodaran | Essie Kim | Phyllis Bowlby | Judith E Deutsch (2019).
In Proc. 13th Int'l Conf. on Virtual Rehab., WG Wright, S Subramanian, G Fluet, M Agmon, RM Proffitt, M Roberts (Eds), Tel Aviv

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine if a custom
self-paced video game promoted intense training without
compromising movement symmetry, while being perceived as less
effortful and more enjoyable than a comparable standard of care
activity. Fifteen participants, (38-72 years old) in the chronic phase
post-stroke participated in this study. They played a custom self-
paced stepping video game (VSTEP) and a comparable standard of
care stepping activity (SOC). Data collected for each activity
included, stepping frequency and accuracy, kinematics, exercise
intensity, perceived effort, and enjoyment. There were no significant
differences in repetitions or exercise intensity between conditions.
The difference of the maximum side step length between the
unaffected and affected lower extremity (LE) was significant in SOC,
but not in the VSTEP condition. Maximum march height of the
affected limb and symmetry of marching was significantly greater for
VSTEP compared to SOC. Perceived effort was statistically
significantly lower and enjoyment was statistically significantly
higher for VSTEP compared to SOC. In conclusion, playing custom
self-paced video games required the same energy expenditure but
was more enjoyable, promoted movement symmetry and was less
effortful than SOC.

Playing Self-Paced Video Games Requires the Same Energy Expenditure but is more Enjoyable and Less Effortful than Standard of Care Activities

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